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St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms > Tropical Storm Debby

Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms

Tropical Storm Debby

Tropical Storm Debby formed in the Gulf of Mexico on June 23, 2012, and moved slowly to the northeast before making landfall on June 26, 2012, near the Suwannee River in Florida. The slow movement of the storm allowed storm surge to build to 0.5 m (1.6 ft) along the Florida Panhandle and 1 m (3.3 ft) on the central Florida west coast. Deep-water wave heights exceeded 3 m (10 ft) for almost three days. The combined effects of surge and storm-induced wave runup created elevated water levels at the shoreline over many tidal cycles, exposing the sandy beaches of the Florida gulf coast to conditions that caused erosion.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hurricanes and Extreme Storms Group investigates coastal change caused by major storms. Predictions of coastal change expected during the landfall of Tropical Storm Debby were made using a USGS-developed model that compares modeled water levels and observed beach elevations. These predictions will be verified using pre- and post-storm photography and topographic surveys. These data will also be used to further refine predictive models of coastal impacts from severe storms.

Response Activities

Pre-landfall


Related links:

National Hurricane Center
National Weather Service

St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms > Tropical Storm Debby

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