USGS - science for a changing world

St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms > Hurricane Ike

Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms

Hurricane Ike

Pre- and Post-Storm Photo Comparisons - Galveston, TX

Location MapLocation 6Location 5Location 4Location 3Location 2Location 1
Location index for photo pairs of Galveston, TX. Green line represents the storm track of Hurricane Ike.

Location 1: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX
Location 1: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX, on September 9, 2008 (top) and September 15, 2008, two days after landfall of Hurricane Ike (bottom). Yellow arrows mark features that appear in each image. Evidence of inundation here includes eroded beach face, sand deposited inland of the shoreline, and distressed vegetation. However, the coastal-change impacts were less severe here than on the Bolivar Peninsula, located northeast of landfall. [larger version]

top of page

Location 2: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX
Location 2: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX, on September 9, 2008 (top) and September 15, 2008, two days after landfall of Hurricane Ike (bottom). Yellow arrows mark features that appear in each image. Hurricane impacts include the breaching of a narrow spit and erosion of the Gulf-front beach. [larger version]

top of page

Location 3: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX
Location 3: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX, on September 9, 2008 (top) and September 15, 2008, two days after landfall of Hurricane Ike (bottom). Yellow arrows mark features that appear in each image. No coastal-change impacts are evident. [larger version]

top of page

Location 4: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX
Location 4: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX, on September 9, 2008 (top) and September 15, 2008, two days after landfall of Hurricane Ike (bottom). Yellow arrows mark features that appear in each image. The coastal-change impacts, beach erosion in front of the seawall, were less severe here than on the Bolivar Peninsula, located northeast of landfall. [larger version]

top of page

Location 5: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX
Location 5: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX, on September 9, 2008 (top) and September 15, 2008, two days after landfall of Hurricane Ike (bottom). Yellow arrows mark features that appear in each image. Hurricane-induced waves and surge destroyed a pier and eroded adjacent beaches. [larger version]

top of page

Location 6: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston
Location 6: Oblique aerial photography of Galveston, TX, on September 9, 2008 (top) and September 15, 2008, two days after landfall of Hurricane Ike (bottom). Yellow arrows mark features that appear in each image. Hurricane-induced waves and surge destroyed a small walkway. Coastal-change impacts include beach and dune erosion, and the removal of considerable dune vegetation. This location is on the right-hand side of the hurricane track and likely experienced the strongest winds, highest surge, and waves. [larger version]

top of page


Related links:

Hurricane Ike: Observations of Coastal Change - Open-File Report 2009-1061
USGS

Gulf Coast Impacts of Hurricanes Gustav and Ike Documented by USGS Extreme-Storms Group
Sound Waves article

St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms > Hurricane Ike

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo FirstGov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/hurricanes/ike/photo-comparisons/galveston.html
Page Contact Information: Feedback
Page Last Modified: May 22, 2014 @ 11:07 AM (JSS)