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St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms

Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms

Storm-Impact Scale

Swash Regime

Swash Regime
cartoon illustration of swash regime
No net change to the system
During a storm, if wave runup is confined to the beach, the beach will erode and the sand will be stored offshore. However, over the weeks and months following the storm, the sand naturally returns to the beach, restoring the beach to its original configuration.

Minimal Impacts of the Swash Regime

During Hurricane Dennis (1999), at this location, wave runup was confined to the beach. The beach eroded but the dune was untouched (see photo and compared cross-section below). Most of the eroded sand returned to the beach in the weeks to months following Hurricane Dennis (1999).

chart showing wave runup photo of dune

return to Storm Impact Scale Overview | continue to Collision Regime


St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > Coastal Change Hazards: Hurricanes and Extreme Storms

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Page Last Modified: April 15, 2014 01:01 PM (JSG)