Monthly Archives: September 2011

Ophiuroid ossicles on the Healy

Here are some pictures of the Ophiuroid ossicles on the Healy.  The ossicles are contained in porous sample bags similar to”tea bags” within a Nalgene bottle. The seawater flows though the top and out the bottom of the bottle.  After … Continue reading

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Passing the Magnetic North

The Healy passed the magnetic north a few days back.    According to one of the captains aboard, the magnetic north pole is at 82°18 N Longitude and 113° 24 W Latitude. A gyroscope is used on the Healy to determine direction … Continue reading

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Ice Liberty

There was time for a short break for ice liberty on the Healy.  Initially, a small Coast Guard team did recon of an area on the ice floe that was chosen because of ice thickness.  The specially trained team went … Continue reading

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Ophiuroid Ossicles: An Indicator for Ocean Acidification?

Molly Miller is part of the scientific research team for the USGS Arctic Cruise 2011. Ophiuroids,  or brittlestars,  have “hard parts” that are are part of an ocean acidification study on the Healy. Here is some information from her on ophiuroid research. … Continue reading

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Weather Balloons: Launching Daily

Our shipmate, Aerographer’s Mate Second Class (AW), Bill Dearing of the U.S. Navy, launches a weather balloon everyday.  The balloons gather data about the upper level winds, temperatures, relative humidity, and air pressure over the Arctic Ocean.  Amazingly, the Arctic … Continue reading

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Air Dropping Supplies to the Healy

Today there was an air drop for the Healy! The Coast Guard from Kodiak Alaska flew a C-130 plane over the Healy to drop parts to repair broken equipment on board, including a pipe and flange for cooling water for … Continue reading

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A Trip into the Hold

Here is a series of photos of Lisa Robbins going down a hatch on the Healy to get some equipment out of the hold below.   You have got to be fit and limber on this boat!  

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How “small” is the Arctic Ocean?

The Arctic Ocean is the smallest of the Earth’s five oceans at approximately 14,056,000 km2 .  Sea Ice in the Arctic Ocean averages about 3 meters thick.  The USCGC Healy can go steadily through Sea Ice up to 4 meters … Continue reading

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Arctic Night: Sunlight 24/7

Now that the Healy is near the North pole, the days are longer with 24 hours of sunlight. Paul Knorr took some photos around 2:30 AM and, as you can see, the sun is low on the horizon but does … Continue reading

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Vertical Profile Data: Fresh for the Ocean

There are three water masses in the Arctic Ocean. The surface waters range from 0-200 meters (m) depth, the intermediate waters from 200 m to 900 m, and the bottom waters from 900-bottom (Millero, 2006).  In comparing Stations 3 and … Continue reading

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What is a Lead?

Leads are large cracks or lanes that are formed by movement of the Arctic sea ice by currents.  They can open suddenly at any time.  They are a great way for the Healy to easily move through the ice.   … Continue reading

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