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St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards > Background

National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards

Happening Now: Active Assessments

To better understand storm impacts on the coast, the USGS National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards group is responding to Subtropical Storm Alberto.

predictions of potential coastal change impacts

May 25, 2018

Waves and surge from Subtropical Storm Alberto will impact Gulf Coast beaches

The USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards storm team is predicting coastal change impacts due to the potential for high waves and elevated water levels along the Gulf Coast from Louisiana through the Florida Panhandle. Predictions will be updated as conditions change and are available in the Coastal Change Hazards Portal.

predictions of potential coastal change impacts

March 1, 2018

Large waves and storm surge from the Noreaster of March 2018 will impact coastlines from North Carolina through Maine

The USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards storm team is predicting coastal change impacts due to the potential for high waves and elevated water levels along a large portion of the U.S. East Coast from North Carolina through Maine. Predictions will be updated as conditions change and are available in the Coastal Change Hazards Portal. Forecasts showing the timing and magnitude of elevated water levels at the shoreline are available in real-time for the U.S. coastline from North Carolina through Maine in the Total Water Level and Coastal Change Forecast Viewer.

2017 Storms

Feb.15, 2018

USGS responds to five storm events in 2017

During the 2017 hurricane season, the USGS National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards group responded to 5 storm events by producing predictions of potential coastal change impacts along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines. In addition, forecasts showing the timing and magnitude of elevated water levels at the shoreline were available in real-time for the U.S. coastline from Florida through Maine in the Total Water Level and Coastal Change Forecast Viewer.

Pre- and post-storm photo comparisons were made for Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Nate using NOAA imagery. These photo comparisons were then used to qualitatively evaluate the predictions of potential coastal change impacts for each hurricane. Water level sensors deployed by USGS crews will also be used to validate the total water level forecasts.

Lidar data was collected along the Florida coastline post-Hurricane Irma and is being analyzed for coastal change impacts. Ground and drone surveys of Pinellas County beaches were also conducted post-Irma and will be used along with the lidar data to validate the forecasts of water level and coastal change.

Look for updates on post-storm activities for each storm on the named storm page: