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St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards > Hurricane Matthew

National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards

Hurricane Matthew Storm Response

Pre- and Post-Storm Photo Comparisons - South Carolina

Hurricane Matthew made landfall on the South Carolina coastline on October 8, 2016 as a  Category 1 storm, causing extensive erosion of the beach and sand dunes. Here, photos pairs are used to compare the pre-storm and post-storm conditions at locations representing a broad range of coastal configurations and their response to the storm. Pre-storm photos were acquired during a baseline survey, August 24, 2011, and post-storm photos were acquired on October 14 and 15, 2016.

Location Map
Location Map.

pre- and post-storm photos
Location 1: Oblique aerial photographs at Pritchards Inlet, South Carolina. Oblique aerial photographs collected before (top) and after (bottom) Hurricane Matthew. Storm waves and surge overwashed the low elevation dunes depositing sand in the marsh. Changes to the inlet and shoals are likely due to a combination of long term and storm-induced coastal processes. The yellow arrows in each image points to the same features in both photos. [larger version]

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pre- and post-storm photos
Location 2: Oblique aerial photographs at Pritchards Island, South Carolina. Oblique aerial photographs collected before (top) and after (bottom) Hurricane Matthew. In the five years between photographs, the line of vegetation has moved landward as trees exposed to saltwater have died. The lack of vegetation allowed further erosion and overwash during Hurricane Matthew. The yellow arrows in each image points to the same features in both photos. [larger version]

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pre- and post-storm photos
Location 3: Oblique aerial photographs at Edisto Beach, South Carolina. Oblique aerial photographs collected before (top) and after (bottom) Hurricane Matthew. Storm waves and surge completely eroded the seaward-most dune and transported a large volume of sand over the road and into the gas station parking lot. The yellow arrows in each image point to the same locations in both photos. [larger version]

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pre- and post-storm photos
Location 4: Oblique aerial photographs at Bull Island, South Carolina. Oblique aerial photographs collected before (top) and after (bottom) Hurricane Matthew. A combination of long-term erosion and storm-induced waves and water levels has resulted in loss of vegetation. Storm-induced waves and surge caused overwash in areas with no trees. The yellow arrows in each image point to the same locations in both photos. [larger version]

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pre- and post-storm photos
Location 5: Oblique aerial photographs at Sand Island, South Carolina. Oblique aerial photographs collected before (top) and after (bottom) Hurricane Matthew. Storm waves and currents eroded the low elevation sand dunes, allowing sand to be transported landward into the marsh. The yellow arrows in each image points to the same features in both photos. [larger version]

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pre- and post-storm photos
Location 6: Oblique aerial photographs at Atlantic Beach, South Carolina. Oblique aerial photographs collected before (top) and after (bottom) Hurricane Matthew. Storm waves reached the base of the dune, leaving a steep scarp. The yellow arrows in each image points to the same features in both photos. [larger version]

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St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center > National Assessment of Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards > Hurricane Matthew

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Page Last Modified: December 05, 2016 11:24 AM (JSG)

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