Jonathan Wynn stands by the Picarro unit holding a cup of coffee.

Boarding R/V Atlantis and Laboratory Set-Up

September 3rd-5th, the scientific team boarded the R/V Atlantis for set-up. Equipment for the ocean acidification team was moved from storage to the main lab where technicians and scientists worked to get it organized and operative before leaving port.

R/V Atlantis docked in Nuuk, Greenland.
R/V Atlantis docked in Nuuk, Greenland.
The deck of the R/V Atlantis in Nuuk, Greenland.
The deck of the R/V Atlantis in Nuuk, Greenland.
Stephen Punchon, Craig Lee, Lorenza Raimondi, Marc Ringuette (left to right) on the R/V Atlanti
Stephen Punshon, Craig Lee, Lorenza Raimondi, Marc Ringuette (left to right) on the R/V Atlantis.
Equipment in main lab of R/V Atlantis ready for set up.
Equipment in main lab of R/V Atlantis ready for set up.

The weather on Friday was cool, rainy and windy with a high of 48 degrees and wind sustained at 23 mph making for a good indoor set up day.  The lab equipment was sorted and distributed among scientific teams, space assigned, and set-up began.  Dr. Jonathan Wynn from USF Geology and USGS scientist Dr. Lisa Robbins worked through out the two days to set up the lab for departure on Sunday, September 6th.

“It’s windy and rainy today – a good day to stay in and set up the lab.”

-Lisa Robbins, Friday, September 4th.

Rain drops on the window of the R/V Atlantis in port on Friday, September 4th.
Rain drops on the window of the R/V Atlantis in port on Friday, September 4th.
Research teams meet on Friday, September 4th for the morning briefing.
Research teams meet on Friday, September 4th for the morning briefing.
USF Geology Professor Jonathan Wynn unpacking sample bottles in the lab.
USF Geology Professor Jonathan Wynn unpacking sample bottles in the lab.
USF Geology Professor Jonathan Wynn moving a cooler in the lab.
USF Geology Professor Jonathan Wynn moving a cooler in the lab.

Specialized equipment used in ocean acidification research was carefully set up and calibrated for use in seawater sampling.  The SeaFET measures pH with an ion selection field effect transistor (ISFET) and will be taking nearly continuous readings of sea surface pH during the cruise.  Other equipment that will be employed by the scientific team includes an Ocean Optics pH spectrometer that will use mCP (meta cresol purple) as the pH indicator dye (pH range of 7.2-8.1) as well as a Picarro to analyze oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in the seawater.  A carbon dioxide monitor was also place on the outside of the ship to monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide levels while the ship is underway.

Setting up the SeaFET in the lab.
Setting up the SeaFET in the lab.
Lisa Robbins unpacks and sets up the pH Spec in the laboratory on board the R/V Atlantis.
Lisa Robbins unpacks and sets up the pH Spectrometer in the laboratory on board the R/V Atlantis.
Set up for pH Spectrometer is complete and ready for water samples.
Set up for pH Spectrometer is complete and ready for water samples.
Jonathan Wynn finishes setting up the Picarro in the lab on the R/V Atlantis.
Jonathan Wynn finishes setting up the Picarro in the lab on the R/V Atlantis.
Jonathan Wynn stands by the Picarro unit holding a cup of coffee.
Jonathan Wynn standing around drinking coffee with the Picarro does all the work!

Share This: